About Amanda Schaffer

Amanda Schaffer

Amanda Schaffer came to Florida Virtual School in 2013. As an educator, she has worked as a teacher, cheerleading coach, and district resource coach. At Orange County Public Schools, she earned her school's title of Teacher of the Year in 2010. At FLVS, she has led training for teachers and teaches Leadership Skills Development. Mrs. Schaffer is passionate about the research of Carol Dweck and helping students and teachers develop a Growth Mindset!

Teamwork: Practice, Perspective, and Persistence

By on August 6th, 2018

I read a quote recently in a favorite Jodi Picoult book that said, “Grandmothers in Botswana tell their children that if you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, you must go together.”

This quote really struck me as the heart of what we do here at FLVS.

We have always been pioneers and we are still striving to blaze the trail. But perhaps the most important concept that has surfaced for us over the years is this idea that we reach our greatest potential not when we get to the finish line the fastest, but when we embrace real collaboration and teamwork that allows us to reach that finish line and so much more.

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Growth Knows No Limits

By on April 26th, 2018

Continuous improvement isn’t just for those who need to work on specific skills.

Continuous improvement is for every professional, every teacher, every student, every person. At Florida Virtual School, we engage in professional learning because we never want to stop growing, expanding our “good enough” to our greatest potential. Continue reading


Rain Clouds and a Growth Mindset

By on October 12th, 2017

I’m not a science teacher. But I know that when the dark, gray, thick clouds roll in, it means rain isn’t far behind. Most people see dark clouds as foreboding and impending doom.

When they roll in, they run for cover. Continue reading


Why Every Teacher Should Go See “Hidden Figures”

By on March 1st, 2017

Hidden FiguresLast month I saw the movie “Hidden Figures” and I was so incredibly inspired.

I am a former English teacher, so my love is words and writing and reading. But I ventured to see this movie because it empowers women and sheds light on some pretty amazing mathematicians who had the power to make this word-loving English teacher a fan of math.  I mean, as a teacher I’ve always loved data, but for me, seeing this movie reinforced why numbers are just as important as words.

We look at data a lot in education, but most of the time I believe we are just looking at numbers and not really grasping the full story data can tell us.

Data does tell a story.

Sometimes it’s a story we don’t want to hear; sometimes it’s a story we already know and we’re just validated. Sometimes it’s a story we never gave any thought and a whole new path is opened for us. If the data you look at regularly is just numbers on a screen and it’s not telling you a story, maybe some insights from “Hidden Figures” will help. Continue reading


Thankful for the Mountains We Climb

By on November 22nd, 2016

blog_thankful_challenges2016 is an incredible time to be a teacher.

I am grateful for each and every day I get to work alongside the best of the best in education.

While expectations are high, standards seem impossible to meet, and the everyday trials and struggles we face seem endless, this time in our country and our world is truly an incredible time to be a teacher. We have so much more access to research about how and why we learn. We have clearer pictures of our brains and all they can accomplish.

We might be up against some very difficult mountains to climb, but the teachers that have gone before us have never been as well equipped as we are today.

As a teacher I’ve always been fascinated with the brain – how it operates so much more than just our physical bodies. Each and every day, new research is published confirming something I think teachers have always known. Continue reading


Using Hamilton the Musical in the Classroom

By on September 28th, 2016

hamilton-blogThe winner of the 2016 Tony for Best Musical was “Hamilton,” an untraditional, hip-hop musical written by Lin-Manuel Miranda about the life of Alexander Hamilton.

The popularity of this musical is impossible to deny – and the most amazing thing is that this hip-hop soundtrack to a founding father’s life has captivated teenagers in a way perhaps no other musical ever has before.

There is no denying this musical crosses age and cultural gaps and has brought a new love for musical theater that is refreshing and powerful. Many teachers are using this incredible soundtrack to start discussions about our history and to reinvent how students study such an important time period.

It is possible teachers of any content could use Hamilton’s addictive appeal to energize their classrooms, but I will share some ideas specifically for English and History teachers. Continue reading


Back to School: Virtual Style

By on August 15th, 2016

Heading Back to School Virtual StyleIt’s August and that means it is back to school!

For much of Florida Virtual School, our teachers and students have been hard at work – even through the summer months.

Of course, the new school year always brings with it anticipation and excitement for the year to come. In traditional schools, there are some eagerly anticipated back-to-school traditions.

So how do we do these in our virtual world?

Let’s walk through a few back-to-school basics!
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Would you look at that?

By on June 27th, 2016

Appreciate the Little ThingsI’ve recently realized just how addicted I am to my phone.

My 2-year-old daughter is the one who helped me see things a bit clearer. Imagine that? See, my 2 year old pays attention to what’s around her. She sees snails idling by on the ground. Snails! And planes that fly in the sky. She sees happy faces in the clouds and she points each and every detail out to me as we play outside.

All the while I sit scrolling on my phone. Scrolling on my phone is relaxing – I will admit it destresses me and allows me the chance to reset myself if I need a few minutes. So I’m not judging phones. I work in the virtual world – trust me, I’m not judging technology. Continue reading


Are We Teaching Girls to Fear Failure?

By on March 14th, 2016

Helping Girls Succeed through FailureMarch is Women’s History month, so what better time than now to ask a very important question:

Are we teaching our girls to fear failure?

Several months ago, my colleague Amy Lowyns, who teaches French for Florida Virtual School sent me an article on this very topic. Of course Amy knew how passionate I am about fostering a growth mindset in all of our students, but when she sent me this article, the idea that maybe we need to look deeper into what we are teaching our girls really lit a fire inside me.

We have been researching the idea that we are teaching our girls to fear failure ever since – and the research is hard-hitting, significant, and extremely eye-opening. Continue reading


Help! I need somebody! Help!

By on January 19th, 2016

Learning to Ask for HelpMy daughter is not quite two, yet her little brain is abuzz – learning new things at every turn of the corner.

Almost constantly she comes up against something new, something strange or challenging, and every time without fail, she looks up at me with her big brown eyes and says “help!”

It astonishes me how easily she is able to admit she needs a helping hand. How quickly she recognizes she’s facing something new and challenging and she may not get it right the first time.  This mindset is what Carol Dweck calls a “growth mindset.” And most children my daughter’s age have it.

They are perfectly okay with asking for help, and not just asking, but receiving it.  Continue reading