Black History Month

FLVS Corkboard: February Highlights

By on February 15th, 2017

FLVS Corkboard February 2017

It’s February and we think you’re simply going to LOVE all that FLVS has to offer!

First, we want to remind you that Presidents’ Day is just around the corner. Please note that Monday, Feb. 20 and is a designated holiday break for all FLVS instructors and support staff.

After the long weekend, there are all kinds of opportunities that extend beyond the classroom or courses you select. Here are a few that FLVS is proud to sponsor:

Digital Learning Day

Celebrate Digital Learning Day (DLD) with FLVS next Thursday, Feb. 23. Digital learning can involve any instructional practice that uses technology to strengthen a student’s learning experience. With digital advances ranging from educational apps to new online courses and programs, DLD is a day to keep up with the latest in online education. Be sure to check out our social media pages on this special day next week as we feature a DLD Elementary Takeover on the FLVS Instagram page. Viewers will be able to see “a day in the life” of our very own FLVS elementary students. Connect with us @floridavirtualschool to make sure you don’t miss it!

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History Club Celebrates Black History Month

By on February 20th, 2015

Black History artwork
In celebration of Black History Month, the FLVS History Club has compiled a gallery of student work on their website managed by the club president.

The History Club newsletter, “A Blast from the Past,” features student articles, essays, reports, videos, paintings, drawings, and artwork.

Along with monthly updates, the site also includes current news and a page featuring historic events from the current month.   Continue reading

Why Black History Month Still Matters

By on February 15th, 2014

black history month coverI can’t remember a time that my heart hurt as badly as it did the day my 6-year-old biracial son told me that he didn’t want to be Black.

He said that people are not kind to Black people, so he wants to be “tan like Mommy.” My heart ached for my son, for my daughter, and for anyone who has ever felt the sting of discrimination. I am a product of relative privilege; I grew up in middle class suburbia and never experienced marginalization or felt a sense of “other-ness” the way my children do and likely will as their lives unfold. Their story is not my own, but as any parent knows, there are few things that spring a mother into action as when her child is in pain. The day my beautiful, precocious, chocolate-skinned little boy told me that he doesn’t want to own the skin he’s in, my understanding of the importance of identity, cultural sensitivity, and diversity education forever changed.

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