Imagination

Reflections from the Class of 2017

By on June 7th, 2017

This post was written by FLVS Full Time National Honor Society President, Olivia Horne.

Olivia HorneFamily and friends – thank you for providing unwavering support, love and encouragement as we pursue our futures.

Teachers and staff – thank you for making those futures possible through your ability to make lifelong learning fun and our dreams accessible.

Fellow graduates – congratulations! From DBAs, to lives lessons, from collaborations to finals, we have each worked incredibly hard. We did it.

As we reach the end of our high school careers, it is only natural for us to reflect upon what led us here. And while our personal histories might differ greatly, we do have one thing in common: the community that is FLVS.

We, Class of 2017, have pursued our education on our own terms. We are the trailblazers, the innovative digital learners, those who are not afraid to take the path less traveled. We have dared to be different. We, Class of 2017, have proven our possession of the invaluable ability to define our own futures. Continue reading


The Future of Learning

By on May 17th, 2017

Future of LearningWhat’s so great about sci-fi and fantasy?

These genres allow us to explore complicated ideas in an intriguing way, and both students and adults love them.

Take The Hunger Games and Harry Potter.

Aside from the excitement of these blockbuster hits, they also tackle real-world issues like poverty, oppression, love, death, and war.

To hook students into the learning process, FLVS tries to find ways to incorporate these types of imaginative elements into our courses to teach and captivate them.

From gaming to virtual reality to medical advances, the FLVS curriculum team is always searching for new and innovative trends that can inform course development.  Continue reading


Seven Survival Skills for Careers

By on November 3rd, 2015

Tony Wagner quoteIn his critically acclaimed book, “The Global Achievement Gap,” author Tony Wagner explores what he considers to be “Seven Survival Skills for Careers, College and Citizenship.”

After spending time with the most successful executives and professional people in the world, Wagner came to the conclusion that there is a gap between what our students need to be successful when they enter the real world and what we are teaching them in the classroom.

As a result, he created a list of essential 21st Century skills that all people need in order to be successful in college, in their career, and for their overall citizenship. Continue reading