Problem Solving

Practical Problem Solving

By on December 15th, 2017

It’s happened to the best of us: you push the power button on the remote and nothing happens. What’s the problem? Does it need new batteries? Is the TV unplugged? Is the power out? To figure it out, you need some problem-solving skills.

Problem-solving skills are important in our everyday lives, our careers, and in learning. Problems may be frustrating, but they can also be opportunities. By helping our students develop strong problem-solving skills, we can help them look at problems differently, do things in a different way, and think critically. Continue reading


12 Months of Life Skills for Student Success

By on January 13th, 2017

Life Skills for StudentsAs we start a new year, educators and parents all have a common goal for 2017 – to ensure that our children have the skills and knowledge they need to be successful for college and a future career.

What if we each set a goal to teach our students one skill a month?

If all of our students put this plan into action today, can you imagine the impact we could make on our future generation?

Today’s workplace values creativity, collaboration, critical thinking, and communication skills. Managing time, setting goals, handling stress, and a variety of other skills can help students succeed in all of these areas.

Ready to get started? Check out the guide below and set reminders on your phone or calendar to help you stay on track.  Continue reading


Being Competitive in Tomorrow’s Workforce

By on November 30th, 2016

Being Competitive in Tomorrow’s WorkforceThe year was 1989.

We saw the birth of the World Wide Web, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the television debut of The Simpsons, and my epic walk onto the stage to receive my high school diploma.

As I proceeded to college, I used the skills that I had learned in high school: doing research using a card catalog, typing reports using an electric typewriter, and doing accounting class projects that required a calculator, a pencil, and a lot of erasers.

If I were to list these skills on my resume today, I would be considered an unqualified candidate.

You may wonder how a college student with outdated skills became an online technology teacher.

It’s simple, really. By updating my skill sets and being able to evolve with new advancements in technology, I honed the skills to which I am referring. Those skills are soft, hard, and transferable. Continue reading


Seven Survival Skills for Careers

By on November 3rd, 2015

Tony Wagner quoteIn his critically acclaimed book, “The Global Achievement Gap,” author Tony Wagner explores what he considers to be “Seven Survival Skills for Careers, College and Citizenship.”

After spending time with the most successful executives and professional people in the world, Wagner came to the conclusion that there is a gap between what our students need to be successful when they enter the real world and what we are teaching them in the classroom.

As a result, he created a list of essential 21st Century skills that all people need in order to be successful in college, in their career, and for their overall citizenship. Continue reading


Genius Brain vs. Normal Brain: Four Key Differences

By on October 5th, 2015

Genius Brain

First published by Genius Awakening

Albert Einstein was a genius.

So were Leonardo DaVinci, Bobby Fischer, Nikola Tesla, Marie Curie, Ludwig van Beethoven, and Madame Da Stael. That is inarguable. You can probably think of dozens more. Then consider the question: Why are these individuals considered geniuses? By what measure are we making this determination? Certainly each of these individuals has contributed something to our society, whether it’s artistically, scientifically, or culturally.

But what makes a genius? Are the brains of these individuals drastically different from non-geniuses, or “normal” people? Continue reading


Foundations of Web Design

By on May 22nd, 2015

Web FoundationsAre you interested in learning how to create a website?

In this honors course, students play the role of an intern at a local business and complete projects using programs such as Adobe CS6 Dreamweaver and Photoshop. Students also learn about HTML code and good design principles.

This course is part of a series that can lead to industry certification in Adobe CS6 Dreamweaver. In addition to taking Introduction to Information Technology as a pre-requisite, students can also take User Interface Design after completing Foundations of Web Design to work towards the certification. Continue reading


Keep Them Learning All Summer Long (1 of 3)

By on July 16th, 2014

libraryEnrichment Activities for Families

In this three-part FLVS Virtual Voice blog series, I will share enriching activities to keep students learning all summer long.

As our children enjoy the long days of summer vacation, parents all over the country have been hyperventilating as they fill 10 weeks of play dates, summer camps, pool parties, and weekend family adventures.  It’s enough to make even the most seasoned parent’s eyes glaze over.  As an educator I encourage parents to add one more activity to their summer calendar: enrichment.

Now wait!

Continue reading