College Readiness

AP Classes vs. Dual Enrollment

This article was originally written and published in the FLVS student newspaper, News in a Click

AP Courses vs Dual EnrollmentIt’s a common question among high school students and their parents: AP classes or dual enrollment?

While there is no right answer for every student, each individual might find that one or both of these options suits them best. Each choice allows students to be challenged by rigorous classes, obtain college credit, improve their college applications and save money on college tuition costs. However, location, qualification requirements, method of obtaining college credit, class offerings and costs differ.

AP, or Advanced Placement, classes are created by AP development committees for the College Board. Each AP class has its own development committee comprised of six or seven high school and college instructors from around the country. The classes (including online Advanced Placement courses) and their respective exams are meant to reflect the curriculum students would encounter in a college-equivalent of that class’ subject, while in a high school setting. Continue reading


Making Connections for the Future

FBLALife is about the connections we make. Sometimes these connections come from people we’ve known our entire lives, friends next door, colleagues, or even classmates at school.

Because fitting in is a big part of a student’s success, especially during the teenage years, making these connections and collaborating with others can help students grow and learn. Studies have demonstrated this, but I learned it firsthand when I was still in school.

Transitioning from middle to high school was difficult for me, so the 9th and 10th grade years were a trying time in my life. Luckily, I had some excellent teachers who helped me adjust. One particularly important moment was the day my 11th grade computer teacher encouraged me to attend a Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) meeting.

When I finally relented and decided to go, I didn’t yet realize I’d made one of the best decisions of my life. Continue reading


Interested in a Head Start on a Lucrative Career?

ITDid you know careers in information technology make up more than 75 percent of the fastest growing occupations IN THE WORLD?!? Having the skills needed to be successful in these careers is a critical piece that FLVS is working to address. With the recent release of 21 new courses leading to some of the most in-demand IT skills and nationally-recognized industry credentials, the time to start preparing is now.

In collaboration with uCertify, FLVS has launched 21 Career and Technical Education (CTE) courses that give students a head start in a variety of IT career pathways, including programming, database administration, networking, cybersecurity, and more! Continue reading


What’s New in Career & Technical Education at FLVS?

New CTEIt would likely be easier to list what ISN’T new with FLVS Get Certified: Career and Technical Education Courses! Since you learned about the many benefits of industry certification in my previous posts, our teams have been quite busy increasing the options and opportunities for students to prepare for and earn those certifications.

In July 2014, we added 12 new certification preparation courses – with another eight to follow this fall! That’s a total of 22 new opportunities for students to show colleges and employers that they have the skills needed for success! Continue reading


To Certify or Not to Certify

CTE 2Since so much emphasis is being placed on kids to accelerate in school, earn college credit while still in high school, and learn more and more, earlier and earlier…one might ask, “Why should I consider getting an industry certification?”

The answer is quite simple: college and career readiness.

Had I been given opportunities to earn a drafting certification during my drafting years back in school (I know this is starting to sound like “I walked to school five miles, uphill both ways…”), my career may very well have taken a different road. I might have become a full-fledged mechanical engineer, instead of the only one in the shop who knew how to operate CAD software and earning the title by default. Continue reading